Kryptonian in the Comics 1986 to 2000

In 1986, Superman got a reboot with Crisis on Infinite Earths. John Byrne re-envisioned Superman's origin, including all things Kryptonian, in the limited run series Man of Steel. The Bridwell alphabet was abandoned in favor of more geometrically-shaped "letters" that matched the new look and feel of Krypton. These symbols still carried no meaning in and of themselves. It wasn't until 2000 that DC began depicting the Kryptonian language in a way that actually contained meaning.

Kryptonian in the Comics 2000 to Present

In 2000, DC Comics released a substitution font for Kryptonian (available on the fonts page) which they began using in their comic books to depict the Kryptonian language. The font had a similar style and feel to the Byrne symbols used since 1986It is important to understand, though, that this is not a language. Rather, it is just a different way of depicting whatever the language of publication might be (e.g., English, French, Spanish, etc.).

Why Not Use a Full Language?

So why doesn't DC use an actual Kryptonian language in its comics? There are several good reasons:

The Alphabet

DC Comics Kryptonian Substitution Font
A B C
A B C
D E F
D E F
G H I
G H I
J K L
J K L
M N O
M N O
P Q R
P Q R
S T U
S T U
V W X
V W X
Y Z  
Y Z  
 
1 2 3
1 2 3
4 5 6
4 5 6
7 8 9
7 8 9
fig. 1

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