Possessives: Inaliable

The second broadest category of possession is "Inalienable". These are items that have some kind of permanent (or semi-permanent) relationship to the possessor. These include:

The Possessive Particle

Inalienable possession is marked with the particle i and follows a fairly simple rule.

Examples:

Example 1

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
,jan, 
,jahn,
ʤɑn
John
i 
i
i
POSS
TrEv 
threv
θɹev
name
John's name

Example 2

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
ROp 
rraop
ra͡ʊp
you
i 
i
i
POSS
ZguZö 
zhguzhor
ʒgu.ʒoɹ
imagination
Your imagination

Example 3

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
hUp 
khuhp
xʌp
me
i 
i
i
POSS
kluv 
kluv
kluv
gratitude
My gratitude

The Exception to the Rule

As with many grammar rules, there's an exception. When referring to a tribe or a house by name, the possessor is always used in adjectival form (following the noun, "house").

Example 4

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
V 
tiv
tiv
the
ZRyTrEv 
zrhythrev
ʒ͡rɪ.θɹev
house
,el, 
ehl
ɛl
El
The house of El

Example 5

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
V 
tiv
tiv
the
ZRyTrEv 
zrhythrev
ʒ͡rɪ.θɹev
house
,zad, 
,zahd,
zɑd
Zod
The house of Zod

The inalienable construct is still used in this context, however, in conjunction with pronouns.

Example 6

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
x 
khuhp
xʌp
my
i 
i
i
POSS
ZRyTrEv 
zrhythrev
ʒ͡rɪ.θɹev
house
My house

Example 7

Translation: Open     Gloss: Open Pop-up
q 
rraop
ra͡ʊp
my
i 
i
i
POSS
ZRyTrEv 
zrhythrev
ʒ͡rɪ.θɹev
house
My house

News Feed

Mar 14 2016  |  Comments: 1
Dec 18 2014  |  Comments: 0
Aug 21 2013  |  Comments: 6
Jul 29 2013  |  Comments: 0
Jul 22 2013  |  Comments: 5
Jul 13 2013  |  Comments: 1
Jul 02 2013  |  Comments: 13
Jun 21 2013  |  Comments: 3
Jun 17 2013  |  Comments: 18